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Benefits of Music therapy in care environments

Music is a cultural universal. Although music’s definitions vary widely around the world, every culture on earth has a form of music. It’s no surprise, then, that its therapeutic properties have been recognised since ancient times. In recent years, music therapy has gained important recognition as a valuable tool in healthcare settings, particularly in care environments. With music therapy, an individual’s physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs will be addressed through music.

In this article, we’ll explore the many benefits of music therapy, including its effects on physical and emotional well-being, communication, social interaction and overall quality of life. Firstly, though, let’s look at what music therapy is.

What is music therapy?

As its name suggests, in music therapy, a trained therapist will use music in a therapeutic way. This will typically involve musical activities like singing, playing instruments and listening to music to help people achieve their unique goals. For some patients, their goals may include improving communication skills or it could be reducing anxiety or depression. For others, music can be used to aid pain management. What’s more, it can simply be used to increase motivation and engagement or enhance a person’s overall quality of life.

Music therapy can be used with people of all ages. It is often used in healthcare settings such as hospitals, nursing homes and rehabilitation centres. It can also be used in schools, community centres and private practice settings. Music therapy is becoming more popular and there is an increased amount of research that demonstrates its effectiveness.

Through music therapy, the aim to is to address a person’s physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs in a therapeutic way. This is based on the idea that music has powerful effects on both the mind and body. Essentially, it can be used to promote healing, reduce stress and improve overall well-being.

Music therapy in community centre

What are the benefits of music therapy in care environments?

There are numerous and diverse benefits of music therapy. One of the main benefits is that music can have a calming effect on patients of all ages and with a wide range of medical conditions or other needs. At a simple level, music is a non-medicated way of helping to reduce anxiety, stress and agitation. This is particularly important in care environments where patients may be experiencing pain, discomfort or emotional distress.

In addition to its calming effects, music therapy can also be a fun and enjoyable activity for patients. It can help to lift their mood and provide a sense of pleasure and enjoyment, which can be particularly important for patients who are experiencing a chronic illness or disability. It takes little (if any) effort to enjoy music, which means it’s a great tool for all.

Another benefit of music therapy in care environments is its ability to improve communication and social interaction. Music can provide a common ground for patients and caregivers to connect and communicate, even if they are unable to communicate verbally. It can also provide a way for patients to express themselves and connect with others on an emotional level.

By providing a non-invasive and enjoyable form of therapy, like music therapy, care settings can help promote healing, reduce stress and improve the quality of life of the patients in their care.

Who does music therapy help?

Music therapy can help a wide range of individuals. This includes people with physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs.

Here are some examples of ways in which music therapy can be used:

Dementia patients

Dementia patients, like those with Alzheimer’s, can benefit significantly from music therapy. The progressive nature of dementia means that there is a decline in cognitive function and memory loss, which can significantly impact an individual’s ability to communicate, socialise and perform daily tasks.

While there is currently no cure, music therapy can provide a valuable form of support and care for individuals living with the disease and can be used to form a person-centred approach. Studies have also shown that music therapy can slow down the behavioural changes associated with ageing as well as cognitive decline.

Research has shown that music is unique in its ability to stimulate areas of the brain that are associated with memory and emotion. This is true even in individuals with advanced stages of dementia. Listening to familiar songs or playing musical instruments can trigger memories, emotions and sensory experiences, which can provide a sense of comfort and familiarity to individuals with dementia.

In addition to its effects on memory, music therapy can also help to reduce agitation and improve mood in individuals with dementia. Caregivers can use music to create a calm and soothing environment and music can be used as a tool to distract individuals during moments of stress or anxiety.

Music therapy can also provide an opportunity for social interaction and connection for individuals. Group music therapy sessions can provide a safe and supportive environment for people to connect with others, express themselves and engage in meaningful activities.

People with learning difficulties

Individuals with learning difficulties can also benefit from music therapy. Music therapy can help to improve cognitive and motor skills, enhance communication and social interaction and increase self-esteem and confidence. It can provide a safe and supportive environment for people to explore and express themselves and can be tailored to their individual needs and abilities.

For some children who struggle with formal learning, either due to learning difficulties (including dyslexia or ADHD), music can be a much-needed release and many individuals who struggle to read and write, excel in music too.

Whenever there are learning difficulties, a person can experience problems with communication, social interaction and motor skills. Music therapy can provide a unique and effective form of support for individuals with learning difficulties, as it can help to improve these areas of function in a safe and supportive environment.

One of the key benefits of music therapy for individuals with learning difficulties is its ability to enhance communication and social interaction. Music can provide a shared language that can be used to connect with others, even if verbal communication is difficult. Through music therapy, patients can learn to communicate and interact with others in a different way. This can be particularly helpful for those with autism spectrum disorders or other conditions that impact social communication.

Music therapy can also help to improve cognitive and motor skills. Playing musical instruments, singing and listening to music can help to improve fine motor skills, coordination and spatial awareness. Additionally, music can be used to teach and reinforce cognitive skills such as memory, attention and sequencing.

Music therapy can also help to increase self-esteem and confidence in individuals with learning difficulties. Through music therapy, individuals can develop new skills and abilities, which can help to build self-confidence and a sense of accomplishment. Additionally, music therapy can provide a safe and supportive environment for individuals to explore and express themselves. This helps to build self-awareness and a positive self-image.

End-of-life care

Music therapy for end-of-life care can help to relieve a person’s symptoms, meet their spiritual needs and address their psychological needs. It can also help to facilitate communication and offer support. Music therapists can also help caregivers and family members find a way of coping and communicating.

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

With an acquired brain injury (ABI), a person can have impairments in language, cognition, motor function, emotional disturbances and sensory processing. Interventions with music can aid rehabilitation to aid brain functions in movement, speech, cognition, sensory perceptions and emotions.

According to research, music therapy can be beneficial for function in the upper extremities, gait, communication and quality of life, in particular after stroke.

Other conditions

Music therapy can also be helpful for people who suffer from mental health conditions like depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Music can provide a way for individuals to express their emotions and process their experiences and can help to reduce stress and promote relaxation. Music has a unique ability to evoke emotions and memories and can serve as a powerful tool for individuals to express and process their feelings in a non-verbal way.

For people with depression, music therapy can provide a way to connect with positive emotions and experiences. Listening to music that is associated with positive memories or experiences can help to improve mood and increase feelings of happiness and well-being. Additionally, playing music or singing can provide a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment, which can help to combat feelings of hopelessness or low self-esteem.

For those suffering from anxiety, music therapy can be a helpful tool for promoting relaxation and reducing stress. Slow and calming music can help to lower heart rate and blood pressure and can serve as a way to calm racing thoughts or anxious feelings. Additionally, music therapy can provide an opportunity for individuals to focus on the present moment and practise mindfulness, which can be helpful for managing anxiety symptoms.

For those with PTSD, music therapy can provide a safe and supportive environment for processing traumatic experiences. Through listening to or creating music, individuals can explore and express their emotions related to their experiences in a non-verbal way. Additionally, music therapy can be used as a way to manage symptoms such as hypervigilance and flashbacks, as it can serve as a grounding tool to bring individuals back to the present moment.

Overall, music therapy is a versatile and effective form of therapy that can help individuals of all ages and abilities.

By providing a way to express emotions and process experiences, reducing stress and promoting relaxation and serving as a grounding tool for managing symptoms, music therapy can help to promote overall well-being and quality of life for individuals with mental health conditions. It can be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. Music therapy can also be used in a variety of settings, including hospitals, rehabilitation centres, schools and community centres.

Therapist helping child with learning difficulties

How is music therapy introduced into care environments?

In many cases, music therapy may be recommended by healthcare professionals as part of an individual’s care plan. Care plans typically outline an individual’s needs, preferences and goals, and can help healthcare providers determine whether music therapy would be beneficial.

Care facilities may also work with trained music therapists to introduce music therapy into their care programmes. Music therapists can work with care staff to identify individuals who would benefit from music therapy and develop customised treatment plans based on their individual needs and abilities.

In some cases, care facilities also offer group music therapy sessions as a way to promote social interaction and engagement among individuals in their care. These sessions can provide a fun and supportive environment for individuals to explore and express themselves through music and can be tailored to their specific interests and abilities.

Music therapy can also be introduced into care environments through the use of music-assisted relaxation or guided imagery techniques. These techniques involve playing calming music and guiding individuals through relaxation exercises or visualisations, which can help to reduce stress and promote relaxation.

Overall, the introduction of music therapy can involve a variety of approaches, including recommendations from healthcare professionals, collaboration with music therapists, group music therapy sessions and the use of music-assisted relaxation techniques. By identifying individuals who would benefit from music therapy and tailoring treatment plans to their specific needs and abilities, care facilities can help to provide a valuable form of support for individuals in their care.

Final thoughts

Music therapy has been shown to offer a wide range of benefits in care environments, from promoting relaxation and reducing stress, to improving mood and enhancing cognitive and motor skills. Through the use of personalised treatment plans tailored to individual needs and abilities, music therapy can offer a safe and supportive environment for individuals to explore and express themselves through music.

For people with dementia, learning difficulties and mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), music therapy can be valuable. It can be a form of support, helping to improve quality of life and promote overall well-being. By incorporating music therapy into care plans and treatment programmes, care facilities can provide a holistic approach to care that addresses the physical, emotional and social needs of individuals in their care.

As music continues to gain recognition as a powerful form of therapy, it is important for care facilities and healthcare professionals to consider incorporating it into their programmes. By doing so, they can help to provide individuals with a unique and effective form of support that can make a meaningful difference in their lives.

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About the author

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Louise Woffindin

Louise is a writer and translator from Sheffield. Before turning to writing, she worked as a secondary school language teacher. Outside of work, she is a keen runner and also enjoys reading and walking her dog Chaos.



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